Booking available no earlier than 3 months prior to the event date. This is due to high demand on our service. We can accept fittings a with a month of the event, additional charges may apply
Booking available no earlier than 3 months prior to the event date. This is due to high demand on our service. We can accept fittings a with a month of the event, additional charges may apply
Cart 0

Clinking Glasses & Putting Bread in your wine? But Why?

british military celebration history tradition

Toasting, or the act of raising a glass in a celebratory gesture and making a brief speech or tribute, has been a tradition for centuries in many cultures around the world. The exact origin of toasting is not entirely clear, as it is believed to have emerged independently in multiple cultures.

It's difficult to determine the exact first recorded use of burnt bread in wine, as this practice dates back several centuries and was likely used by many cultures around the world. However, there are references to this practice in ancient texts from various parts of the world.

For example, in ancient Greece, it was common to add spices and flavourings to wine to improve its taste. The host would often take the first sip of wine, and then pass the cup to the guests. To ensure that the wine had not been poisoned, the host would drop a piece of toasted bread into the cup, which would absorb any toxins that might be present. This practice was mentioned by the Greek philosopher Plutarch in his work "Symposium of the Seven Sages."

In ancient Rome, it was also common to add spices and flavourings to wine, and toasted bread was sometimes added to the mixture. This practice was mentioned by the Roman poet Ovid in his work "Ars Amatoria," where he advised his readers to add burnt bread to their wine to improve its flavor.

The use of burnt bread in wine was also mentioned in medieval European texts, including the "Decameron" by Italian author Giovanni Boccaccio and "The Canterbury Tales" by English author Geoffrey Chaucer.

So while it's difficult to pinpoint the exact first recorded use of burnt bread in wine, it is clear that this practice has been around for centuries and has been used by many different cultures throughout history.

Types of Toast

There are some examples of traditional British military toasts:

1. The Queen/King: This is a toast to the monarch of the United Kingdom, who is also the Commander-in-Chief of the British Armed Forces.

2. The Armed Forces: This is a toast to the men and women who serve in the British Armed Forces, including those who have given their lives in service.

3. The Regiment/Unit: This is a toast to the specific military unit or regiment to which the speaker belongs or is honouring.

4. The Fallen: This is a toast to those who have given their lives in the service of their country.

5. The Absent Comrades: This is a toast to those who are not present at the gathering, either because they are serving elsewhere or because they have passed away.

6. The Host Nation: This is a toast to the country in which the speaker is currently stationed or visiting.

7. The Allies: This is a toast to the military allies of the United Kingdom, recognizing the importance of international cooperation in the defence of freedom.

These toasts are often accompanied by the clinking of glasses and the phrase "To the Queen/King/Armed Forces/Regiment/Fallen/Absent Comrades/Host Nation/Allies!"

What is the Loyal Toast?

The loyal toast is a traditional toast in the United Kingdom and some Commonwealth countries that is offered to the monarch. In the United Kingdom, it is also known as the "Queen's/King's (or other monarch's) Most Excellent Majesty" toast.

The loyal toast is usually made at formal occasions such as state banquets, military dinners, and other events where the monarch is present or represented. It is typically the first toast of the evening and is offered before any other toasts.

The loyal toast is usually proposed by the host or a designated speaker, who raises a glass and says "Ladies and Gentlemen, I give you the Queen's/King's (or other monarch's) Most Excellent Majesty." The guests then stand and repeat the phrase before taking a sip of their drink.

It is considered customary and respectful to stand during the loyal toast, and failure to do so may be seen as a breach of etiquette. In the military, it is also common for personnel to salute during the loyal toast.

The loyal toast is a tradition that dates back several centuries and is a symbol of loyalty and respect to the monarch and the country.

Clinking Glass

The clinking of glasses during a toast is a traditional custom that has been practiced for centuries in many cultures around the world. There are several theories as to the symbolism behind this practice.

One theory suggests that the clinking of glasses is meant to produce a ringing sound that would drive away evil spirits or demons that might be lurking in the room. The clinking of glasses would also alert the guests that their glasses had not been tampered with, as any poison or harmful substance would be expected to produce a different sound.

Another theory suggests that the clinking of glasses is a sign of trust and goodwill between the guests. By clinking their glasses together, the guests show that they are willing to share a drink and celebrate together.

In some cultures, the clinking of glasses is accompanied by a specific phrase, such as "cheers," which is meant to convey a message of good wishes or congratulations to the other guests.

Regardless of the exact symbolism behind the clinking of glasses, it remains a widely recognized and practiced tradition that is used to mark special occasions and celebrate with friends and loved ones.

Cheers, Prost, Salute

The word "cheers" is often said when clinking glasses as a way of expressing good wishes and celebrating together with friends and family. The origins of the word "cheers" in this context are not entirely clear, but there are a few theories as to how it came into common use.

One theory suggests that "cheers" may have originated from the medieval French word "chiere," which means "face" or "countenance." The word "chiere" was often used as a salutation when greeting someone, and it is possible that it evolved into the modern-day expression "cheers" as a way of wishing someone good health and happiness.

Another theory suggests that "cheers" may have come from the Old English word "cyse," which means "wine cup" or "goblet." In medieval England, it was common to raise a toast by saying "cyse," and this may have evolved into the modern-day expression "cheers."

Regardless of its origins, the word "cheers" has become a popular expression used to celebrate special occasions and express good wishes to others. When clinking glasses, saying "cheers" is a way of acknowledging the company of those around you and wishing them health, happiness, and good fortune.

In addition to "cheers," there are many other popular sayings that are often used when clinking glasses to celebrate a special occasion or to simply enjoy a drink with friends or family. Here are a few examples:

  1. "Salud" - This Spanish word means "health" and is often used as a toast to wish good health to the people around you.

  2. "Prost" - This German word means "cheers" and is commonly used when clinking glasses together with friends in German-speaking countries.

  3. "Santé" - This French word means "health" and is often used as a toast to wish good health and happiness to the people around you.

  4. "Sláinte" - This Irish word means "health" and is often used as a toast when drinking with friends in Ireland or other parts of the world.

  5. "Bottoms up" - This phrase is often used as an invitation to finish the drink in your glass in one go.

  6. "Here's to you" - This phrase is a way of acknowledging the people you are clinking glasses with and expressing your appreciation for their company.


Older Post