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Booking available no earlier than 3 months prior to the event date. This is due to high demand on our service. We can accept fittings a with a month of the event, additional charges may apply
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Tradition

"Pickle Night": A Celebratory Tradition of the Royal Navy

"Pickle Night": A Celebratory Tradition of the Royal Navy

In the rich tapestry of naval traditions, "Pickle Night" stands out as a cherished and historic celebration in the Royal Navy. This annual event, steeped in maritime lore, has its origins in a remarkable piece of naval history, and it continues to be observed with great enthusiasm today. Let's delve into the background, notable stories, customs, and etiquette that define this unique occasion. Historical Origins: The roots of Pickle Night can be traced back to a momentous event in naval history—the Battle of Trafalgar. On October 21, 1805, the British Royal Navy, under Admiral Lord Nelson's leadership, achieved a decisive...

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Clinking Glasses & Putting Bread in your wine? But Why?

british military celebration history tradition

Clinking Glasses & Putting Bread in your wine? But Why?

Toasting, or the act of raising a glass in a celebratory gesture and making a brief speech or tribute, has been a tradition for centuries in many cultures around the world. The exact origin of toasting is not entirely clear, as it is believed to have emerged independently in multiple cultures.It's difficult to determine the exact first recorded use of burnt bread in wine, as this practice dates back several centuries and was likely used by many cultures around the world. However, there are references to this practice in ancient texts from various parts of the world.For example, in ancient...

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Formal Mess Dinner Etiquette - steeped in history

Formal Mess Dinner Etiquette - steeped in history

British army mess dinner etiquette is similar to other military mess dinner protocols, but there may be some differences in the programme of events and specific customs. Here are some key elements of British army mess dinner etiquette:1. Dress code: Dress code for a British army mess dinner is formal, with military personnel wearing their dress uniform or mess kit. Civilian guests should also dress formally, with men wearing black tie and women wearing a formal dress.2. Seating arrangement: Seating arrangements are usually organized by rank, with the most senior officer sitting at the head of the table. Officers are seated...

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The Guard of Honour / Sword / Saber Arch

The Guard of Honour / Sword / Saber Arch

Military weddings often have unique traditions and customs that reflect the history and culture of the armed forces. Here are some examples: Arch of Sabers / Sword Arch: Is a tradition in which military members form an archway with their swords or sabers for the newlyweds to walk through. The tradition dates back to medieval times, when knights would use their swords to create a passage for their bride to walk through. Today, the Arch of Sabers is a way for military members to honor the newlyweds and show their support.  This part is the more common as you see...

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What is Sabrage? - 'Champagne is needed in Victory, But also Defeat' Napoleon Bonaparte

army army wedding british military celebration history military wedding sabrage tradition wedding

What is Sabrage? - 'Champagne is needed in Victory, But also Defeat' Napoleon Bonaparte

Sabrage is a ceremonial technique for opening a bottle of champagne or sparkling wine using a sabre. It involves removing the top part of the bottle, including the cork and the glass lip, with a swift and precise stroke of the blade.The history of sabrage dates back to the Napoleonic era, when the French cavalry used their sabres to open champagne bottles during victory celebrations. Legend has it that the tradition began with Napoleon himself, who would offer a bottle of champagne to his officers and then open it with his sword.Today, sabrage is often performed at special events and...

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